Environmental & Geotechnical

Environmental Cleanup

As a former military facility, Treasure Island was used by the U.S. Navy primarily as a personnel-processing center, but also had activities, typical of military bases of that era, involving petroleum, solvents, paints and other materials that must be cleaned up to stringent standards overseen by the Environmental Protection Agency and the California Department of Public Health.The Navy has evaluated Treasure Island for radiological contamination and found that it is consistent with background levels throughout the Bay Area.
Multiple regulatory agencies have performed independent evaluations and have all concluded that there is no risk to human health and safety in residential areas on Treasure Island. These agencies include:
The findings by these agencies were confirmed by the California Department of Public Health, which has even more stringent standards than the federal government. As part of the decommissioning process, the U.S. Navy must ensure that Treasure Island is free of environmental hazards and safe for residential development.
 
The findings by these agencies were confirmed by the California Department of Public Health, which has even more stringent standards than the federal government.
As part of the decommissioning process, the U.S. Navy must ensure that Treasure Island is free of environmental hazards and safe for residential development. As a former military facility, Treasure Island was used by the U.S. Navy primarily as a people-processing center, but also had activities involving petroleum, solvents, paints and other materials that must be cleaned up to stringent standards overseen by the Environmental Protection Agency and the California Department of Public Health.
Any soil that may have been radiologically impacted as part of military training activities has been and will continue to be disposed of in approved landfills outside of California. The Navy also has identified and removed low-level radioactive glow-in-the-dark deck markers found on the northern end of the island near a solid-waste disposal area that continues to be remediated. All areas are required to be fully remediated by the Navy prior to transfer to the City of San Francisco.
The Navy is transparent about its findings, its plans for cleanup and the status of various parcels. It hosts regular public meetings to discuss environmental issues with residents of Treasure Island and the general public. More information can be found here. In 2005, the Navy established the Treasure Island Environmental Restoration Advisory Board (RAB) comprised of local community members and representatives of regulatory agencies to exchange information, concerns, issues, and ideas on the environmental restoration decision-making process.
Yerba Buena Island has no comparable issues. Learn more about the island here.

Geotechnical

Treasure Island is a man-made island built on a shoal that extends north from Yerba Buena Island. Dredged sandy material was pumped from the bay floor in 1936-1938 to create the island in its present shape.

To accommodate development and in order to raise the elevation of the island to guard against sea level rise, we are undertaking a sophisticated soil improvement program, costing in excess of $200 million. The soil improvement program includes:

  • Rapid consolidation of soils so that settlement is complete prior to building new roads, utilities, and buildings.
  • Increase the soil capacity so that the lower-height buildings (up to 7-stories) can be supported on mat foundations. Taller buildings will require deep foundations.